Art Slice

My work and what inspires it -

Raf Simons & "Dior and I"

Nearly three years ago, amidst skepticism and intrigue, Raf Simons became Creative Director of one of the last remaining couture houses in the world. His earlier minimalist work meant he was far from the obvious choice to take the reigns of  the opulence and grandeur that is The House of Dior. All reservations vanished with his debut collection, however, as he sent his models walking through a patina’d Parisian mansion dripping in wall-to-ceiling flowers of every variety.

The development of his work was captured and seen for the first time this year in the highly-aniticipated documentary, Dior and I. In one of my favorite cinematic moments of the year, we see Raf cry backstage as he watches his collection blossom in front of his eyes. This moment of unabashed happiness coincides with barely-moving shots of women modeling the new collection to summarize the culmination of his labor of love.  -Garrett Flemming 


Howardena Pindell

If this painting is really what the detail image looks like, I want to dive in and swim in it all day

Untitled #19, 1977 Mixed media on canvas 94 x 74 inches (upper) Untitled #19, 1977 (detail) Mixed media on canvas 94 x 74 inches (lower)

Untitled #19, 1977 Mixed media on canvas 94 x 74 inches (upper)
Untitled #19, 1977 (detail) Mixed media on canvas 94 x 74 inches (lower)

Frida Kahlo's belongings

After Frida Kahlo died in 1954, her husband Diego Rivera shut her belongings in a bathroom at their Mexico City home, the Blue House – then demanded it be locked until 15 years after his death. In fact, the room wasn’t opened until 2004, when Ishiuchi Miyako photographed its intimate contents. Here are the artists’ beloved belongings, from sunglasses to handpainted corsets. 

Frida by Ishiuchi Miyako is at Michael Hoppen Gallery, London SW3, from May 14 - July 12

 

Classic cats-eye glasses worn by Kahlo

Classic cats-eye glasses worn by Kahlo

Kahlo’s right leg was thinner than her left after childhood polio – and it was later fractured in 11 places when she had a horrific bus accident in her 20s. As a result, she wore long, traditional Tehuana dresses that concealed her lower body

Kahlo’s right leg was thinner than her left after childhood polio – and it was later fractured in 11 places when she had a horrific bus accident in her 20s. As a result, she wore long, traditional Tehuana dresses that concealed her lower body

Kahlo’s fringed boots, the right one with a stacked heel

Kahlo’s fringed boots, the right one with a stacked heel

The artist’s makeup compact

The artist’s makeup compact

Orchids to You and another nail polish

Orchids to You and another nail polish

Bathing suit in mint green

Bathing suit in mint green

After her bus accident, Kahlo was in a full body cast for three months, and she remained in pain for the rest of her life. She painted her casts and corsets, turning them from medical equipment into artworks

After her bus accident, Kahlo was in a full body cast for three months, and she remained in pain for the rest of her life. She painted her casts and corsets, turning them from medical equipment into artworks

Kahlo’s friends noted that the more pain she felt, and the more incapacitated she became, the more elaborate her outfits were

Kahlo’s friends noted that the more pain she felt, and the more incapacitated she became, the more elaborate her outfits were

Kahlo’s leg was amputated in 1953. She designed this prosthetic leg with embroidered red lace-up boots and a bell attached

Kahlo’s leg was amputated in 1953. She designed this prosthetic leg with embroidered red lace-up boots and a bell attached

One of the corsets worn by Kahlo

One of the corsets worn by Kahlo

A skirt of green silk and lace attached to a body corset

A skirt of green silk and lace attached to a body corset


 

Love

Wayne Thiebaud, Cakes, 1963

Wayne Thiebaud, Cakes, 1963

Oh. and why haven't I thought to do this yet?! HELLO?! I need this for my next birthday:


Ed Moses and new work of mine coming soon

Ed Moses

Ed Moses

I'm working on a group of new paintings that will be finished soon! :D I won't be able to post images of most of them for a while because many of them are for a show of mine this September and others I'll be submitting to different galleries- but just to say I have new stuff in the works ;)

Um..

This girl accidentally backed into and knocked over the late Cy Twombly's sculpture, Untitled 1954, on Sunday at Houston's Menil. ..errrmm........yikes.

This girl accidentally backed into and knocked over the late Cy Twombly's sculpture, Untitled 1954, on Sunday at Houston's Menil. ..errrmm........yikes.

Van Gogh's table where he ate his last meals

I got to see this this past week! In Carmel, CA, in the tiny backroom of a beautiful little restaurant, Casanova.  One of the owners of Casanova Restaurant, Walter Georis, departed with his family for a three-month holiday in Paris. Intrigued after reading the cookbook Van Gogh's Table, Walter took the family on a train ride 22 miles northwest of Paris to have lunch at the Auberge Ravoux in Auvers-sur-Oise, a small but well-known artist's village. Vincent van Gogh spent the final seventy days of his life boarding at the Auberge where he painted the picturesque countryside, the church at Auvers, the popular portrait of his friend Dr. Gachet, and Adelaine Ravoux. The second and third floor of the Auberge Ravoux, named the Maison de van Gogh, has since been turned into a small museum honoring the life of Vincent van Gogh. Here guests can visit the attic room where the artist lived before enjoying the hearty country cuisine of the period in the restaurant below. Back in Paris, Walter Georis and Dominique Janssens, the owner of the Auberge Ravoux and Maison de van Gogh, met and became great friends over a six-hour lunch at Café Beaujolais on the left bank. As a symbol of their new friendship, Dominique honored Walter by sending him the table at which Vincent van Gogh enjoyed his meals at the Auberge Ravoux. At Casanova, the table is in a private room called Van Gogh's Room decorated in the style of the Auberge Ravoux

I got to see this this past week! In Carmel, CA, in the tiny backroom of a beautiful little restaurant, Casanova. 

One of the owners of Casanova Restaurant, Walter Georis, departed with his family for a three-month holiday in Paris.

Intrigued after reading the cookbook Van Gogh's Table, Walter took the family on a train ride 22 miles northwest of Paris to have lunch at the Auberge Ravoux in Auvers-sur-Oise, a small but well-known artist's village.

Vincent van Gogh spent the final seventy days of his life boarding at the Auberge where he painted the picturesque countryside, the church at Auvers, the popular portrait of his friend Dr. Gachet, and Adelaine Ravoux.

The second and third floor of the Auberge Ravoux, named the Maison de van Gogh, has since been turned into a small museum honoring the life of Vincent van Gogh. Here guests can visit the attic room where the artist lived before enjoying the hearty country cuisine of the period in the restaurant below.

Back in Paris, Walter Georis and Dominique Janssens, the owner of the Auberge Ravoux and Maison de van Gogh, met and became great friends over a six-hour lunch at Café Beaujolais on the left bank. As a symbol of their new friendship, Dominique honored Walter by sending him the table at which Vincent van Gogh enjoyed his meals at the Auberge Ravoux.

At Casanova, the table is in a private room called Van Gogh's Room decorated in the style of the Auberge Ravoux

vanghoghs_table.jpg

Will Cotton

The Coming Storm, 2014. Oil on linen. 72" * 96"

The Coming Storm, 2014. Oil on linen. 72" * 96"

                         Ruin, 2014. Oil on linen. 34" * 24"

                         Ruin, 2014. Oil on linen. 34" * 24"

                   Relic, 2007. Oil on linen. 65" * 60"

                   Relic, 2007. Oil on linen. 65" * 60"

Dec. 2- YIPE!!!! I'm back now!!!

I (very) sadly haven't been able to paint near as much lately and now, I'm incredibly excited to say I can finally start diving back in! 

To start out my jump back in here's some inspiration from the great Mike Kelley -